A $1 Million Powerball Ticket Is About To Be A Worthless Piece Of Paper

Posted on June 20, 2018

The clock is ticking and time is about to run out for one lucky Pennsylvania Lottery player. Their winning Powerball Jackpot ticket worth $1 million is about to expire.

Check your wallets, junk drawers, and glove compartments because on June 23, 2018, the winning ticket won’t be worth the cost of the paper it is printed on.

The $1 million winning Powerball ticket

The winning ticket was sold on June 24 at 5th Variety Store located at 6013 N. 5th St. in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The ticket matched all five numbers but not the Powerball resulting in the $1 million prize.

The winning numbers are 10-22-32-36-58.

On June 24, the Powerball jackpot for a ticket the matched all five numbers plus the Powerball was $79,000,000.

According to the Pennsylvania Lottery, there were no tickets that matched all the numbers, and the jackpot was rolled over to $92,000,000 for the next drawing.

The unclaimed winning ticket was the sole $1 million winner. One player matched 4 of 5 numbers, the Powerball, and purchased the Power Play for a winning ticket worth $200,000.

In total, there were 25,799 winning Powerball lottery tickets sold in Pennsylvania on June 24, 2017, with prizes ranging from $4 – $1 million.

The Lottery has this advice for players:

“Players should promptly check every ticket, every time, using self-service scanners at retailers or with the ticket checker on the Lottery’s official mobile app.”

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What happens when a ticket goes unclaimed

In March, Lancaster Online spoke to Gary Miller, a spokesman for the Pennsylvania Lottery about the lottery ticket claim process.

Miller said it is “extraordinarily rare” for a large prize to go unclaimed. The Lottery tracks large unclaimed prizes and puts out a news release when they are close to expiring.

As far as Miller knows, the largest unclaimed prize was another $1 million Powerball ticket. It expired back in 2015.

That $1 million prize and all unclaimed winnings remain in the Lottery Fund benefitting programs that support Pennsylvania’s elderly population.

Pennsylvania Lottery winners are a matter of public record

It is not unusual for a winner to delay coming forward to claim their prize when a significant amount of money is at stake. A delay allows time for the winner to make arrangements to protect their winnings and their identity.

Pennsylvania law requires a winner’s name, town and county, the date of the win, and the amount awarded to become part of the public record.

In New Hampshire earlier this year, an anonymous woman challenged the requirement to be publicly named as an invasion of her privacy. A judged ruled that she could remain anonymous and collect her winnings via a trust.

Miller is not aware of a time when a trust attempted to claim a prize. If someone tried to claim a prize using a trust, Miller believes the Lottery would consider the members of the trust to be public information.

There is no reason to believe the winner of the $1 million prize is avoiding claiming their prize due to the requirement to release their personal information.

In fact, it is rare that large prizes remained unclaimed so close to the expiration date.

There are just a few days before the winning ticket expires. It’s now or never. It might be worth your time to do a thorough scan of every last piece of paper you come across. Especially, if you bought a lottery ticket last summer,

For now, the question remains where in Pennsylvania is the $1 million golden ticket? Come out, come out, wherever you are!

Kim Yuhl Avatar
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Kim Yuhl

Kim Yuhl is a freelance writer and blogger who writes about poker culture and the online gambling industry. A part-time member of the poker media since 2013, Kim recently sold her marketing business to write full-time while traveling around the world. You can learn more about her work and travels at kimyuhl.com.

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