Nevada Gaming Control Board Chairman AG Burnett Steps Aside

Posted on December 12, 2017 - Last Updated on December 13, 2017

[toc]The man who has headed up gaming regulation efforts in Nevada for the past five years is moving on.

NGCB’s Burnett set to leave

Nevada Gaming Control Board (NGCB) Chairman AG Burnett will be leaving his post effective Dec. 22. The NGCB, along with the Nevada Gaming Commission, oversees all forms of gaming in the state.

Burnett was installed as chairman of the NGCB by Gov. Brian Sandoval in October 2012 after being appointed to the board in 2011.

He is considered one of the leaders in gaming regulation around the world.

“A.G. was a fair and thoughtful regulator who impressively balanced the roles of top gaming watchdog with ensuring that our state’s leading industry maintained flexibility to innovate and achieve forward progress,” Sandoval said on Monday. “He was respected by both his peers and the industry he served and I know that he will look back on his career in public service with pride.”

Burnett on his tenure in Nevada

Here’s more from Burnett in a release from the governor’s office:

“Following a nearly 20-year career in gaming regulation I have elected to retire from state service. It has been an honor to serve as Chairman of the Gaming Control Board Chairman and I would like to thank Governor Sandoval for his constant support and faith in my ability.

During my tenure, the Gaming Control Board has handled unprecedented regulatory challenges, effected numerous regulatory and statutory changes to accommodate shifts in technology, and addressed issues such as internet gaming, nightclub regulation and policy regarding cannabis in connection with gaming.

I am proud of the work we have done, what we have accomplished and would like to express my gratitude to the Control Board staff for their tireless work on behalf of our state.”

What happened during Burnett’s time

Prior to his appointment to the NGCB, Burnett served as Senior Deputy Attorney General in the Gaming Division of the Nevada Attorney General’s Office. In that post he represented the NGCB, the Nevada Gaming Commission, and the Nevada Commission on Sports.

Burnett oversaw the rollout of online poker in the state. Additionally, he managed the implementation of an interstate compact for iPoker with Delaware. Nevada regulators are currently working on implementing an interstate compact that would allow Nevada, Delaware, and New Jersey to share online poker players across state lines.

What’s next for Burnett

Burnett will joined the law firm McDonald Carano as a partner with its Gaming & Administrative Law Group.

The law firm cited its tradition of providing clients “with access to lawyers with real working experience in gaming regulatory roles.”

“A.G., internationally recognized as a leader in gaming regulation, is respected throughout the gaming industry and by gaming regulatory authorities throughout the world,” said Bud Hicks, Chairman of McDonald Carano’s Gaming & Administrative Law Group.

“In addition to his vast experience with Nevada gaming licensing matters and regulatory requirements, A.G. brings tremendous knowledge relating to the issues that are presently roiling the gaming industry, including matters relating to the potential spread of interstate sports betting opportunities and internet gaming developments.”

Burnett told The Nevada Independent that he was leaving for private practice to make it possible for his wife a break from her teaching duties.

Burnett also told The Indy that a controversy involving state attorney general Adam Laxalt played no role in his departure. A recorded conversation between Burnett and Laxalt appeared to intimate that the former asked the latter to intervene on the behalf of casino magnate Sheldon Adelson, although no charges came out of the matter. Laxalt is also a candidate for governor.

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Dustin Gouker

Dustin Gouker has been a sports journalist for more than 15 years, working as a reporter, editor and designer -- including stops at The Washington Post and the D.C. Examiner. He has played poker recreationally for his entire adult life and has written about poker since 2008.

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